Jan 8, 2021

Northern Data acquires new facility in northern Sweden

Data Centres
Sustainability
Nordics
hpc
Harry Menear
2 min
The new site is powered with 100% renewable energy, including up to 4.5 GW of available hydroelectric power
The new site is powered with 100% renewable energy, including up to 4.5 GW of available hydroelectric power...

German data centre operator Northern Data has announced the acquisition of a new facility located in the north of Sweden. Purchased in response to “massive customer demand”, the new facility comprises six data centre halls spread over 2.5 hectares of land. 

The purchase has been funded by an issuance of €21mn in shares, and a cash payment of €4mn.   

Following the acquisition, Northern Data plans to further expand the facility to an unspecified degree. 

The facility is located in the Swedish city of Boden, some 80km south of the Arctic Circle. Consistently low ambient temperatures (the area annually averages around 1.3 degrees Celsius) will, Northern Data claims, make the data centre ideal for hosting power-intensive high performance computing (HPC) workloads. 

As a result of low ambient temperatures and cutting-edge design, the facility has an outstanding PUE of 1.07, well below the industry average of 1.67. 

Northern Data adds that, in addition to low temperatures to support efficient cooling, the area is uniquely well-connected to local renewable power generation resources. Electricity used to power the site is being drawn from 100% renewable sources, including local hydro power generation plants, which can provide approximately 4.5 GW (or 14 terawatt hours (TWh) per year) of electricity at ultra-low prices. 

"Due to the high demand for HPC capacity, we are constantly reviewing options to quickly secure additional sites through acquisitions in addition to building our own data centres. This allows us to further accelerate our growth,” commented Northern Data CEO Aroosh Thillainathan.

“In view of this strategy, the new site in Northern Sweden is not only a real stroke of luck but also a significant expansion step for our company. Not only can we use it instantly, but we can also expand and develop it quite considerably, which we will do immediately. Our new site offers important advantages, such as lowest energy costs and ultra-efficiency, which will make it an important part of the Northern Data group going forward."

The site, which was previously owned by Hydro66, received several sustainability awards, and has achieved a number of efficiency certifications that rate it among the best-performing data centres in the world. 

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Aug 5, 2021

Green Mountain doubles capacity at Oslo data centre campus

GreenMountain
datacentres
colocation
Nordics
2 min
Courtesy of Green Mountain
The DC3-Oslo expansion consists of a new 4 MW data centre, doubling the total IT capacity of Green Mountain’s ultra-sustainable campus. 

Norwegian sustainable, high-security data centre operator Green Mountain has completed an expansion project at its data centre campus in Oslo. 

The DC3-Oslo campus was originally completed just nine months ago. This week, Green Mountain announced that it has finished building a second data centre on site. The new facility was completed “a few days ahead of schedule”, according to project manager, Håvard Lurås, who reflected that the project had “progressed nicely,” although he admitted that “the Covid-19 situation posed challenges with, for instance, equipment deliveries.” 

The new data centre at DC3-Oslo adds a further 4 MW of critical IT capacity to the campus, effectively doubling its capacity. 

Green Mountain CEO, Tor Kristian Gyland, explained in a statement that the rapid expansion was undertaken in response to massive interest in the site, adding that Green Mountain has several more expansion stages planned for DC3-Oslo in the near future. 

“Norway’s abundance of low-cost renewable power, the government’s beneficial framework conditions, and Green Mountain’s ability to deliver sustainable and high-quality data centers at a rapid speed to market make a strong value proposition. We have secured power and land to grow this site for several years to come,” he said. 

Situated about 20 kilometres from downtown Oslo, the campus is a “built-to-suit project for a large international cloud provider” - which remains unnamed. 

Green Mountain - which was recently acquired by Israeli property investment firm Azrieli for $849mn - reportedly also has expansion projects planned for its two other data centre locations in the country. The company operates a 7.5 MW hydro-powered colocation campus comprising four buildings (two of which are Uptime Tier III certified) in Rjukan, Telemark, and an ultra high-security 22,600 square metre data centre housed inside a decommissioned NATO ammunition storage bunker built into a mountain in Stavanger

Gyland explained that, thanks to bountiful supplies of renewable energy and strong interconnection routes to the rest of Europe, the Nordic region is expected to “take up a disproportionate share of the expected growth in Europe,” over the coming years. He added that he was “very optimistic about the future.” 

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