Oct 29, 2020

Is the on-premises data centre dead yet?

On-Premises
Data Centres
Cloud
colocation
Joanna England
3 min
As companies clamour to digitally transition, one report suggests on-site data centres are no longer the Holy Grail of data storage
As companies clamour to digitally transition, one report suggests on-site data centres are no longer the Holy Grail of data storage...

Traditional data centres have been flagging for a while now, and new information suggests companies are now far more likely to outsource their information to secure data management companies, rather than build their own facilities.

A study by the leading research and advisory consultancy, Gartner, suggests that while a large proportion of information is migrated to the cloud, businesses that require new apps and services are looking to outsource their data management.

According to the study, 10% of enterprises have already decommissioned their traditional on-site data facilities, and by 2025, an estimated 80% of organisations will follow suit.

Data centre management companies offer a range of services to businesses, and companies can shop around and look for the best options, that consider network latency, customer population cluster, geopolitical limitations, and the placement of applications. 

Security is a huge consideration too. With the growing sophistication of cybercrimes, many companies struggle to keep up with the latest tech that keeps their data safe. A recent report on third party data centres and cloud uptake by Deloitte, states, “Cybersecurity attacks are rising in sophistication, and a shortage of skills means that many companies are struggling to manage security in-house. Some IT executives are turning to third-party cloud and managed security services, with cloud providers delivering sophisticated cyber capabilities and solutions and cloud offering the potential of helping to mitigate security incidents.”

The storage of data is big business. Amazon Web Services recently launched Outposts – a hybrid data storage management system that enables companies to have data storage equipment on their site. This is plugged into the local network and then managed by AWS, which provides secure cloud services, colocation options and more.  

The cost associated with rebuilding old data centres doesn’t add up economically for most companies. As security regulations tighten up, latency standards sharpen and more capacity is required, using a third-party data management entity where someone else manages the physical infrastructure, makes much more sense. 

Colocation has become popular because it provides better availability, reliability, certified building tier levels, energy efficiency, dedicated facilities management, and the ability to scale.

To put the decline of on-site data centres into perspective, Gartner’s 2019 IT Key Metrics Data reveals the percentage of IT budgets spent on data centres has fallen in the last ten years to just 17% of its former total. 

Cloud computing is also gaining popularity with SMEs, enabling enterprises to utilise applications over super-fast internet connections, and bypassing the need for investing in computer software and hardware. 

Today, hardware that stays on business premises, states Gartner, is mainly equipment that is needed to run mission-critical processes. These may require greater management than services currently on offer via the cloud infrastructure.

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Jun 20, 2021

Schneider Electric reveals new IT Innovation report

SchneiderElectric
datacentres
CompanyReport
DigitalEmissions
3 min
Schneider Electric has released the Digital Economy and Climate Impact report revealing new innovations for sustainability and resiliency in data centres

Schneider Electric has released a new IT innovations report titled “Digital Economy and Climate Impact”, with the aim of gaining an understanding of how digitised and smart applications will be powered in the future. The company says that the report predicts that IT sector-related electricity demand is expected to increase by almost 50% by 2030. 

Despite this, the report also shows that emissions would not increase by more than 26% by the same year, following the decarbonisation of the electricity system. In an attempt to reduce this rise in emissions the Schneider Electric TM Sustainability Research Institute recommends continued efforts in achieving efficiencies on the IT and energy sides at both the component and system levels. 

The report highlights how the rise of edge computing technologies require a “specific focus” due to these systems being less efficient than hyperscale data centres. “When the world locked down, it also logged on and internet traffic soared,” said Pankaj Sharma, EVP, Secure Power, Schneider Electric. 

“It’s misleading to assume that digital activity will inevitably result in a deeply problematic increase in CO2 emissions. The analysis from the Schneider Electric Sustainability Institute puts to rest many of the worst-case scenario claims predicting IT-related electricity use will double every five years. That said, as an industry, we must remain vigilant in finding new sources of sustainability gains while ensuring resiliency as digital keeps life moving forward”, he added. 

As well as the release of the report, Schneider Electric also announced several updates to its EcoStruxure IT data center infrastructure management software, Galaxy VL 3-phase uninterruptable power supply (UPS), introducing an industry-leading single-phase UPS, the APC™ Smart-UPS™ Ultra. All introductions are designed to advance the industry forward in meeting sustainability goals while increasing the resiliency of IT and data centre infrastructure, the company said. 

Managing hybrid data center and edge IT environments

Also showcased in Schneider Electric’s report are the increasing demands on digital consumption. According to the company, these create a more complex hybrid environment inclusive of enterprise, cloud, and edge data centres. Addressing the unique management challenges of a hybrid IT environment, Schneider Electric has announced updates to its EcoStruxure IT software to increase efficiency and resiliency, including:

  • Increased remote management capabilities: New granular remote device configuration features enable users to change configurations on one or more devices – including the new Galaxy VL and APC Smart-UPS Ultra single-phase UPS units – from one centralised platform with EcoStruxure IT Expert. This update, combined with previously released software insights on device security health, enables the user to identify faulty devices or configurations and address them in a matter of clicks, keeping their hybrid IT environment secure.
  • Improved environmental monitoring: Environmental monitoring systems ensure users have eyes and ears on data centre and IT deployments from anywhere, anytime. With this update, users can push mass configurations remotely for NetBotz cameras 750 and 755 quickly and efficiently increasing security across the critical infrastructure.
  • Enhanced remote capacity modeling and planning: With EcoStruxure IT Advisor’s new capabilities, users can remotely compare an unlimited number of racks and easily identify available capacity, view what assets are deployed and their dependencies.

Sharma concluded: “Schneider Electric has been focused on sustainability for the past 15 years and was recently named the most sustainable corporation in the world. We have embraced the mindset that future innovation will deliver better efficiency across the broader connectivity landscape. By making smart intentional choices, our industry can help mitigate how much electricity and emissions result from the rising appetite for digital technologies”.

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