Jul 2, 2021

The Salvation Army’s data centre suffers ransomware attack

datacentre
cyberattack
SalvationArmy
Data
2 min
The Salvation Army has confirmed that it was targeted by a ransomware attack that compromised some of its corporate systems located in the UK

The Salvation Army, a Christian charity organisation, has recently confirmed that it was targeted by a ransomware attack affecting its London data centre. 

A Salvation Army spokesperson confirmed to The Register that the Charity Commission and the Information Commissioner’s Office have been informed about the incident. Also, its staff is working to notify any other relevant third parties.

“We are investigating an IT incident affecting a number of our corporate IT systems. We have informed the Charity Commission and the Information Commissioner’s Office, are also in dialogue with our key partners and staff and are working to notify any other relevant third parties.”

She continued: “We can also confirm that our services for the vulnerable people who depend on us are not impacted and continue as normal.”

The organisation has not currently issued a statement regarding the intensity of the ransomware attack, the identity of the threat actor, or the details of the compromised data. 

 

‘Criminals will be quick to take advantage’


 

Jake Moore, a cyber security specialist with Slovakian antivirus firm ESET, told The Register: “It is vital that those who could be at risk are equipped with the knowledge of how to mitigate further attacks. The first few days and weeks after a breach are the most important, as criminals will be quick to take advantage of the situation and strike while they still can.”

Speaking about the ransomware attack targeting the Salvation Army, Trevor Morgan, product manager at comforte AG, told Teiss that: “No cyberattack is acceptable or warranted. Yet, most of us recoil strongly when charitable people and organisations like the Salvation Army become the targets of criminals. Every organisation—even a non-profit—has valuable data about its employee base as well as external customers and other contacts. This data must be guarded not only with perimeter-focused security but also with data-centric methods that protect the data itself.”

The Cyber Security Breaches Survey, published by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport found that just over a quarter (26%) of charities said they had experienced a cyber breach in the last year.

Action Fraud, which is run by the City of London Police as the national fraud and cybercrime reporting service, said that during the festive season last year, almost £350,000 of charitable donations ended up in the pockets of criminals who made fundraising appeals online in the name of well-known charities.

 

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Aug 2, 2021

Microsoft hyperscale plans prompt Lab3 New Zealand launch

Microsoft
Cloud
hyperscale
datacentres
2 min
The launch of Lab3 in New Zealand is in response to surging cloud demand and Microsoft’s hyperscale data centre investment.

Lab3, an Australian cloud migration specialist, has announced it is launching in New Zealand after being prompted by a surge in demand for cloud services and Microsoft’s investment into hyperscale data centres. 

The company, which was founded in 2017, has appointed David Boyes as Chief Executive Officer and Rich Anderson as Chief Operating Officer. According to Companies Office records, Boyes and Anderson each have a 10% share in Lab3’s New Zealand business.  Commenting on cloud migration, Boyes said: “Across New Zealand, in government and every industry sector, organisations are looking to migrate to the cloud to modernise their technology environments.” He added that the Coronavirus pandemic was fuelling a “ need to tap into the power of data, facilitate remote work and meet public expectations of a virtual world.”

Chris Cook, Group CEO of Lab3 said the business was "first and foremost about client success" which drives the company’s product innovation and motivation to expand into New Zealand. “We look forward to working closely with Microsoft to deliver more for New Zealand clients,” he said.

Microsoft’s New Zealand hyperscale data centre investment plan

Microsoft’s investment into a hyperscale data centre region in New Zealand meant the resulting facilities will aim to provide several organisations with access to the security and scalability of a public cloud without sending data offshore.

Vanessa Sorenson, Managing Director of Microsoft New Zealand, said: “We’ve seen a tremendous acceleration in cloud migration over the past year as organisations have responded to global disruption and conversely, recognised the global opportunities a digital operation brings. 

“Our research with IDC shows public cloud technologies are set to create 102,000 local jobs and add [NZ]$30 billion to the New Zealand economy over the next four years, so we’re delighted to welcome a partner of LAB3’s calibre to New Zealand, to help more organisations realise those gains even faster," she added. 

Lab3’s clients include several fintech organisations, a global software vendor, Australian federal and state government agencies, and insurance and banking corporations. The company employs over 200 staff and has three advanced specialisations across migrations, Azure virtual desktop, and security. 

 

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