Nov 13, 2020

Huawei to invest $23mn in third Thai data centre

Cloud
Data Centres
APAC
Networking
Harry Menear
2 min
Array
This latest project cements Thailand’s position as the heart of Huawei’s operations in SEA...

This week, Chinese tech leader Huawei announced plans to invest a further $23mn into the construction of a new data centre in the Thai capital of Bangkok.

The data centre, which is scheduled to come online in 2021 (presumably Q3 or Q4, although details are sketchy about Huawei’s progress on the project so far) will be the company’s third data centre in the country. 

Speaking at a conference titled “Powering Digital Thailand 2021: Huawei Cloud and Connect" on Wednesday, Abel Deng, chief executive of Huawei Thailand, framed the investment as the latest step in Huawei’s plans to support Thailand’s emergence as a digital and economic leader in the region. 

"We have our mission, which is to grow in Thailand and contribute to Thailand," said Abel at the conference. 

Huawei’s two pre existing data centres in Thailand came online in 2018 and 2019, and are located in the country’s Eastern Economic Corridor and Bangkok, respectively. According to Abel, this latest investment is equal in expenditure to those made into each previous data centre. 

Abel added, "We are confident of Thailand's potential to become ASEAN's first digital hub, and this will help Thailand's digital economy contribute to 30 percent of the GDP by 2030.” 

Tech giants around the world are ramping up investment in different ASEAN countries, as an economic proxy war for the future of the region’s digital economy heats up. 

Microsoft recently selected Taiwan as the home base for its Azure Cloud operations in the area, announcing four major projects in the country, including the creation of a Taiwan based data centre region, the creation of a new cloud hardware team, the launch of an industrial ecosystem and an expansion of its cybersecurity capabilities, a move which represents its biggest investment in the country for 31 years.

Cloud giant Google has chosen to back Singapore and Indonesia’s efforts. The company’s first Asian data centre is a super high-tech urban multi-storey facility in the heart of Singapore, and its first Indonesian facility was announced in March of this year.  

Huawei’s ongoing investment in Thailand is clearly the beleaguered Chinese giant’s best hope of remaining competitive in one of the fastest-growing economic regions in the world. 

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Jun 14, 2021

Inside the future of Ireland’s subsea cable landscape

Interxion
AquaComms
euNetworks
IDA
4 min
Meet the industry experts sitting down to discuss subsea cabling, digital transformation, Data Gravity, and the fate of Ireland’s digital economy. 

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, experts from Aqua Comms, GTT, euNetworks, the IDA, and European data centre leader Interxion will take part in a virtual panel to explore the evolving relationship between subsea cabling, digital transformation, Data Gravity and the future of Ireland’s digital economy. 

You can tune in to the event, which is taking place between 10:30 PM - 11:30 PM JST on Tuesday, here - or view it later on-demand. The hour-long panel will also conclude with a 20 minute Q&A session with the audience, moderated by Interxion’s Senior Director of Market Development, Mike Hollands

The Gateway to Europe

Since the first transatlantic cable was laid in 1858, briefly connecting Newfoundland and Valentia Island in County Kerry, Ireland has served as a critical gateway for North American organisations looking to gain access to Europe. 

Today, some of the largest firms in the world, like Pfizer, Janssen, Zurich, Metlife, Google and VmWare use Ireland for their European Headquarters. The combination of an English-speaking workforce (a boon made all the more important as Brexit makes the UK and the north of Ireland an increasingly complex environment that provides diminishing opportunities to access the rest of Europe), a cultural and regulatory landscape that welcomes foreign investment, and world-class connectivity makes the country an unparalleled choice for firms looking to establish a foothold in the EU. 

As a result, Ireland has become one of the world’s leading data centre hubs. And, thanks to the exponential growth of Data Gravity, and the increasingly essential nature of digital infrastructure, Ireland’s role as a launchpad into Europe is only likely to grow more prominent.  

The future of Ireland’s digital economy is, experts from Interxion argue, closely linked to its ability to provide connectivity between Europe and North America. The further development of the country’s subsea cable industry will form the keystone of the discussion being held on Tuesday, as experts from throughout the industry share their insights into the challenges and opportunities that face operators working towards a more connected future for Ireland. 

Meet the Experts 

On Tuesday, speakers from the IDA, Aqua Comms, GTT Communications, euNetworks, and Interxion will discuss key themes, including key facts about Ireland’s existing subsea infrastructure, plans for the future of the industry, the challenges that need to be overcome, the interaction between subsea and terrestrial networks, and the next steps in Ireland’s role as the gateway to Europe. 

Ciarán Delaney

Ciaran Delaney, VP of Operations and Optical Engineering, GTT
Ciaran Delaney, VP of Operations and Optical Engineering, GTT

Ciarán Delaney has served as the VP of Operations and Optical Engineering at GTT since 2017. With more than 10 years worth of experience in the telecoms industry, he’s a leading expert on transatlantic connectivity, with an in-depth knowledge of both submarine and terrestrial cable systems.  

Nigel Bayliff 

Nigel Bayliff, CEO, Aqua Comms
Nigel Bayliff, CEO, Aqua Comms

Currently serving as the CEO and Director of the Board at Irish submarine cable firm Aquacomms, Nigel Bayliff has more than 30 years of experience in the telecom infrastructure market. His past roles have granted him unique perspectives gained from buying, building and running international submarine cable networks as an operator as well as developing and implementing cables as a constructor. 

Toby Williams

Toby Williams, Head of Infrastructure Investment, euNetworks
Toby Williams, Head of Infrastructure Investment, euNetworks

As the Head of Infrastructure Investment at euNetworks, Toby Williams has spent over a decade developing digital infrastructure throughout Europe, Ireland, and the UK. He has also done extensive work developing dark fibre networks, which are a key component in providing the agility and capacity necessary for operators to overcome the challenges posed by Data gravity. 

Shane Nolan

Shane Nolan, Head of Technology and Emerging Business, IDA Ireland
Shane Nolan, Head of Technology and Emerging Business, IDA Ireland

The Irish Investment Development Agency (IDA) is one of the key drivers of overseas investment in the country, and is responsible for the attraction and development of foreign investment in Ireland. Shane Nolan has worked in various roles throughout the IDA for more than 18 years, and is currently serving as the organisation’s Head of Technology & Emerging Business. 

Mike Hollands 

Mike Hollands, Senior Director of Market Development, Interxion
Mike Hollands, Senior Director of Market Development, Interxion

Interxion: A Digital Realty Company, is one of Europe’s leading data centre operators and, as part of Digital Realty’s Platform DIGITAL, is taking a leading role in raising awareness of the threat posed by Data Gravity. Mike Hollands has served as Interxion’s Senior Director of Marketing Development & Strategy since 2017, and is a 15 year veteran of the industry. At Tuesday’s event, he will serve as moderator, guiding the discussion surrounding the evolution of Ireland’s role as a gateway to Europe and regional data centre and subsea cabling hub. 

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