Jan 11, 2021

DCI to build $400mn, 36MW data centre in Sydney

Data Centres
hyperscale
colocation
construction
Harry Menear
2 min
DCI Data Centres’ new facility, a hyperscale data centre adjacent to its existing Sydney site, will be ready to spin up in Q4 of 2022
DCI Data Centres’ new facility, a hyperscale data centre adjacent to its existing Sydney site, will be ready to spin up in Q4 of 2022...

Australian data centre operator DCI announced this week that it has received development approval to begin construction on a new hyperscale facility in the western end of Sydney.

The new site, SYD02, will be constructed on the same property as the company’s current SYD01 data centre. Whereas DCI’s existing facility is an 11MW installation, the new build will - upon completion - have a projected IT load capacity of 36MW. 

According to DCI’s press statement, the project will cost $400mn and be purpose built to meet the colocation needs of hyperscale hyperscale cloud, content and managed service providers.

“The team are delighted to have secured this approval which will be a crucial part of our three-stage strategy for this key site,” commented DCI’s Chief Executive Officer Malcolm Roe, in a statement to the press. 

He added that, “We are also very excited to be leading the industry in delivering new cooling technologies to significantly enhance our power utilisation effectiveness and minimising our impact on the environment.” 

Details regarding the SYD02 facility’s power generation, cooling and energy management capabilities have yet to be announced. However, DCI says that it expects the data centre to “set industry-leading benchmarks for water and energy efficiency,” adding that the project will stimulate the local economy and create jobs, both at the construction and operational stages. 

The SYD02 development comes on the heels of an additional planned facility in Adelaide, the first Tier III/IV data centre in southern Australia. The project was unveiled in August last year and joins the company’s existing Adelaide data centre, which has been in operation for more than 20 years. 

DCI, which is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Canadian investment and asset management firm Brookfield Asset Management, plans to continue to expand its presence in Australia and New Zealand as the demand for digital infrastructure grows. Reports on the period between 2017 and 2021 estimate regional data centre industry growth as higher than 8%, not taking into account the dramatic uptick in data centre spending and demand due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. 

In addition to its ANZ expansion, DCI Data Centres also claims to have plans to develop its presence in Asia. 

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Jun 21, 2021

NUS and NTU launch cooling project for tropical data centres

NTU
NUS
datacentres
Sustainability
3 min
A project by The Nanyang Technological University and the National University of Singapore aims to find cooling solutions for tropical data centres

The National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Nanyang Technological University (NTU), have announced a project in an attempt to source and develop new cooling solutions for data centres located in tropical areas. According to the companies, the programme costs S$23mn (US$17.1mn) and plans to research, build and test innovative and sustainable cooling solutions. 

The Sustainable Tropical Data Centre Testbed (STDCT)

The NUS and NTU say that the Sustainable Tropical Data Centre Testbed (STDCT) will act as a research point and innovation hub for the project. Facebook, along with the National Research Foundation Singapore (NRF), is also involved, providing funding for the programme. Further support from other partners includes the Infocomm Media Development Authority, Ascenix, CoolestDC Keppel Data Centres, Red Dot Analytics, and New Media Express. 

Commenting on working with the companies, Facebook Vice President of Infrastructure, Alex Johnson, said: “We are excited about the opportunity to partner NUS, NTU, Keppel Data Centres and the CoolestSG community to develop innovative solutions that reduce the carbon footprint and energy consumption of the average data centre, particularly those located in tropical areas like Singapore”. 

The NTU and NUS highlight that Singapore houses 60% of Southeast Asia’s total data centre market, and aims to supply 12% of the country’s total energy needs by 2030. This results in the need to reduce the carbon footprints and power consumption of data centres, meaning more innovative cooling solutions are required, the NTU and NUS said. 

Professor Chen Thuan, Deputy President of Research & Technology at the NUS, said: “Data centres are a critical enabler of the digital economy, but the average data centre can exert a significant environmental burden. Aligned with RIE 2025, sustainability is a key research focus of NUS, and our researchers have deep expertise in developing integrated solutions for tropical, urban and Asian settings”.

How will the Sustainable Tropical Data Centre Testbed (STDCT) help to provide cooling solutions?

According to the NUS and NTU, the STDCT will be built using equipment such as a novel desiccant-coated heat exchanger and a StatePoint Liquid Cooling System (SPLC) designed by both Nortek Air Solutions and Facebook. The institutions also say they will adopt chip-level hybrid cooling to ensure servers remain cool. 

Furthermore, the use of artificial intelligence (AI) will aim to manage the “smart operations” of the technologies so that the data centres are water and power efficient, as well as able to preserve equipment and servers. 

The NTU and NSU said in a joint statement the combination of the cooling technologies could reduce energy consumption “significantly” and greenhouse gas emissions by up to 25%, compared to traditional air-cooled data centres. If adopted industry-wide across the entire tropical region, the energy usage of the data centre industry could potentially be lowered by at least 40%”, the companies said. 

The STDCT is expected to be operational by 1 October 2021.

 

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